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Stock identification of the sciaenid fish Micropogonias undulatus in the western North Atlantic Ocean using parasites as biological tags
Baker, T.G.; Morand, S.; Wenner, C.A.; Roumillat, W.A.; de Buron, I. (2007). Stock identification of the sciaenid fish Micropogonias undulatus in the western North Atlantic Ocean using parasites as biological tags. J. Helminthol. 81(Sp. Issue 2): 155-167. dx.doi.org/10.1017/S0022149X07753920
In: Journal of Helminthology. Cambridge University Press: London. ISSN 0022-149X; e-ISSN 1475-2697
Peer reviewed article  

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Trefwoorden
    Biological tags; Identificatie; Parasieten; Micropogonias undulatus (Linnaeus, 1766) [WoRMS]; Marien

Auteurs  Top 
  • Baker, T.G.
  • Morand, S.
  • Wenner, C.A.
  • Roumillat, W.A.
  • de Buron, I.

Abstract
    Proper fisheries management of the Atlantic croaker Micropogonias undulatus is necessary in the United States due to the commercial and recreational importance of this fish species. Croaker stock structure in the western North Atlantic has been investigated in the past by various authors, with inconclusive results. In this study, macroparasites were used as biological tags to identify putative croaker stocks in the area between New Jersey and Florida, which encompasses the Mid Atlantic Bight and the South Atlantic Bight separated at Cape Hatteras, North Carolina. The macroparasite community of the fish was identified, showing the presence of 30 species in four phyla, of which several were new host records, and one species, a monogenean, was new to science. A canonical correspondence analysis was applied to determine the variables responsible for parasite species composition, to resolve the question of croaker stock structure in the western North Atlantic Ocean. This analysis showed that latitude was the deciding variable delineating the parasite community composition of the Atlantic croaker. Among the 30 parasites, 15 were identified as putative tags according to qualitative criteria, and then 10 out of those 15 were selected as being appropriate tags using quantitative criteria. These parasite tags support the presence of two stocks roughly separated at the known biogeographical barrier at Cape Hatteras.

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